Need help? +44 (0) 1497 821205
Currency

Currency conversions are estimated and should be used for informational purposes only.

Take Heart – Valentine’s Day at the Great English Outdoors

Our January Sale is now over but we have launched Take Heart – Our Valentine’s Section, full of individual and inspiring ideas for Valentine’s presents

There are varying opinions as to the origin of Valentine’s Day.  From St. Valentine, a Roman who was martyred for refusing to give up Christianity,  and died on February 14, 269 A.D.  Reputedly he left a farewell note for the jailer’s daughter, who had become his friend, and signed it “From Your Valentine”. To the story of Saint Valentine, who served as a priest in the temple during the reign of Emperor Claudius. Claudius then had Valentine jailed for defying him. In 496 A.D. Pope Gelasius set aside February 14 to honour St. Valentine

Gradually, February 14 became the accepted date for exchanging love messages and St. Valentine became the patron saint of lovers. The date was marked by sending poems and simple gifts such as flowers

Hundreds of years ago in England, many children dressed up as adults on Valentine’s Day. They went singing from home to home. One verse they sang was:
Good morning to you, valentine;
Curl your locks as I do mine —
Two before and three behind.
Good morning to you, valentine.

In Wales wooden love spoons were carved and given as gifts on February 14th. Hearts, keys and keyholes were favourite decorations on the spoons. The decoration meant, “You unlock my heart!”

In the Middle Ages, young men and women drew names from a bowl to see who their valentines would be. They would wear these names on their sleeves for one week. To wear your heart on your sleeve now means that it is easy for other people to know how you are feeling

In some countries, a young woman may receive a gift of clothing from a young man. If she keeps the gift, it means she will marry him

Some people used to believe that if a woman saw a robin flying overhead on Valentine’s Day, it meant she would marry a sailor. If she saw a sparrow, she would marry a poor man and be very happy. If she saw a goldfinch, she would marry a millionaire

A love seat is a wide chair. It was first made to seat one woman and her wide dress. Later, the love seat or courting seat had two sections, often in an S-shape. In this way, a couple could sit together — but not too closely!

Think of five or six names of boys or girls you might marry, As you twist the stem of an apple, recite the names until the stem comes off. You will marry the person whose name you were saying when the stem fell off

Pick a dandelion that has gone to seed. Take a deep breath and blow the seeds into the wind. Count the seeds that remain on the stem. That is the number of children you will have

If you cut an apple in half and count how many seeds are inside, you will also know how many children you will have

We make and source beautiful things from natural materials

We are specialists in hand made Leather goods including studded Dog Collars and wallets from 200 year old Russian Reindeer Leather; offering for sale a range of ethical tailored Clothing and wool knitwear and a collection of useful but beautiful Homeware made from HornLeatherWool: old and new Welsh blankets and textiles; Slate and Wood . As well as an eclectic selection of one-off collectibles in our Originals section

Take a visual tour of our shop with our You Tube clip

web wild flower meadow jpg

Sign up to our newsletter

We would like to give something back to you – our almost monthly Nature Notes – random observations of the natural world
Get offers and pre sale alerts
By signing up to the mailing you agree to email marketing. For more information please read our privacy policy.